High School Welding Students Compete

    Welding Manufacturing Day, Puma Steel, Cheyenne, Wyoming - Oct 1, 2017Please view the story by Mariah Ellis (KGWN TV Cheyenne, WY)

    CHEYENNE, Wyo.- Ten Wyoming high school finalists competed in a state welding competition at Puma Steel in Cheyenne. The students competed for more than $10,000 worth of scholarships to help them further a career in a field of interest.

    Cheyenne East High School senior, Conner Wilson, said he's never competed in anything in school until the welding competition came to his attention. Wilson said his interest sparked at a young age and added, "When they offered this competition for welding, I was super excited."

    Successful Welding: Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

    Welder Wearing Personal Protective EquipmentWelders create their own problems by exhibiting lack of confidence and not wearing their Personal Protective Equipment  (PPE).  “Certification welds” should be better than “production welds” because the weld coupons are new, clean and the weld surfaces are smooth. The weld test booth is clean, lighted and a safe workplace.  Welders tend to overlook the fact that their success in providing a satisfactory demonstration of their welding performance is important to all parties.

    Weld Failures - Part I

    Owner Expectations, and how they are affected by weld failuresby, Dr. Jesse A. Grantham, Forensic Welding Engineer

    The following article initiates a three-part series of topics for The Welding Leader (TWL) audience.  There are many ways to write about “Weld Failures”.   The perspectives presented in the following parts address different points of view of the Owner, Welds and the Forensic Welding Engineer.     

    Owner Expectations

    Weld failures are the result of decisions and occasionally random accidents.  A weld failure means a weld that does not meet the Owner’s expectations.  Many weld failures are more related to company politics than welding metallurgy.

    Every weld is the result of someone’s deliberate choices about design, materials, process and inspection.  It is just that straight forward.  When any one of these four key elements does not meet the Owner’s expectations, the costs for the project increase and welds unable to meet the Owner’s needs are considered failures.

    How Much Does a Certified Welding Inspector (CWI) Make?

    Certification has a direct correlation with higher incomeWhat is a CWI?

    Certified welding inspectors work in various industries related to construction. Furthermore, certified welding inspectors’ daily duties are filled with numerous responsibilities that are essential in maintaining the safety standards of in the construction industry. On the job site, certified welding inspectors ensure that all related construction activities follow specific guidelines, in accordance with city, state, and federal safety regulations. They also inspect plans, verify inspection and welding calibrations, and make sure that all welding materials are in proper condition for future projects. Additionally, welding inspectors inspect all welding equipment, such as regulators, cables, and welding machines.

    During the construction phase, welding inspectors are responsible for monitoring heating values, ensuring the proper temperature controls are being used, and verifying that individuals maintain all compliance issues.

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